Pascal: The Cost Of Disbelief (Stocks Don’t Get Less Risky)

Blaise Pascal, a brilliant 17th-century mathematician, famously argued that if God exists, belief would lead to infinite joy in heaven, while disbelief would lead to infinite damnation in hell. But, if God doesn’t exist, belief would have a finite cost, and disbelief would only have at best a finite benefit.

Pascal concluded, given that we can never prove whether or not God exists, it’s probably wiser to assume he exists because infinite damnation is much worse than a finite cost.

When it comes to investing, Pascal’s argument applies as well. Let’s start with an email I received this past week.

“The risk of buying and holding an index is only in the short-term. The longer you hold an index the less risky it becomes. Also, managing money is a fool’s errand anyway as 95% of money managers underperform their index from one year to the next.”

This is an interesting comment as it exposes two primary falsehoods.

Let’s start with the second comment “95% of money managers can’t beat their index from one year to the next.” 

One of the greatest con’s ever perpetrated on the average investor by Wall Street is the “you can’t beat the index game.” It is true that many mutual funds underperform their index from one year to the next, but this has nothing to do with their long-term performance. The reasons that many funds, and investors, underperform in the short-term are simple enough to understand if you think about what an index is versus a portfolio of invested capital.

  1. The index contains no cash
  2. It has no life expectancy requirements – but you do.
  3. It does not have to compensate for distributions to meet living requirements – but you do.
  4. It requires you to take on excess risk (potential for loss) in order to obtain equivalent performance – this is fine on the way up, but not on the way down.
  5. It has no taxes, costs or other expenses associated with it – but you do.
  6. It has the ability to substitute at no penalty – but you don’t.
  7. It benefits from share buybacks – but you don’t.
  8. It doesn’t have to deal with what “life” throws at you…but you do.

But as I have addressed previously, the myth of “active managers can’t beat their index” falls apart given time.

Larry Swedroe wrote a piece just recently admonishing active portfolio managers and suggesting that everyone should just passively invest. After all, the primary argument for passive investing is that active fund managers can’t beat theirindices over time which is clearly demonstrated in the following chart.”

(Click on image to enlarge)

“Oops. There are large numbers of active fund managers who have posted stellar returns over long-term time frames. No, they don’t beat their respective benchmarks every year, but beating some random benchmark index is not the goal of investing to begin with. The goal of investing is to grow your ‘savings’ over time to meet your future inflation-adjusted income needs without suffering large losses of capital along the way.”

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Disclosure: The information contained in this article should not be construed as financial or investment advice on any subject matter. Real Investment Advice is expressly disclaims all liability in ...

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