The Corporate Bond Market: Binge-Borrowing

“An average month in recent years would see investors buy about $130 billion of corporate bonds,” noted Reynolds. “Investors just bought more than 40 percent of that monthly average in just three trading days!”

For those of you who have ever had the pleasure of a good, long visit with Reynolds, he is anything but prone to using exclamation points. (!)

In any event, waves of heavy issuance often coincide with big deals carrying ‘concessions,’ or enticements in the form of higher yields than what the issuer’s existing bonds offer. Despite 2017’s already extraordinary deal flow, a good number of issues stood precedence on its head, coming out of the gate with negative concessions. “It’s as if corporate bond buyers are rabid, as if there are not enough corporate bonds to go around, even though there is a record amount of corporate bonds!” added Reynolds.

The kicker – there always is one when fever sets in – is that issuers are earmarking proceeds as generically as they can, for “general corporate purposes.” In other words, they can use the sales proceeds for whatever they desire, including share buybacks.

But wait! (Can exclamation points be contagious?) Haven’t we just learned that buybacks took a nosedive in the latest Standard & Poor’s data release? That quarter-over-quarter share repurchases had fallen by 12 percent and tanked by a stunning 25.5 percent over 2015’s third quarter? What superb sleuthing you’ve done, Watkins!

And right you are, except this one little thing. The pre-election world is so passé.

What are the odds share repurchases reaccelerate under the new administration? In one word ‘growing,’ fed by two springs. The first is mathematically driven. Calpers, the country’s largest pension, recently announced it would be “gradually” lowering its rate of return target to 7.0 percent from 7.5 percent. In the nothing-is-free department, estimates suggest taxpayers will have to cough up an additional $2 billion per year to make up for what the pension no longer anticipates in the form of pension returns.

(Suspend reality as the pension returned 0.61 percent in its most recent fiscal year ended June 30. We could ride off on a tangent but link to this if you’d like to hear more on pensions’ prospects here.)

View single page >> |

Disclosure: None.

...more
How did you like this article? Let us know so we can better customize your reading experience. Users' ratings are only visible to themselves.

Comments

Leave a comment to automatically be entered into our contest to win a free iPad Pro.