Again?

It is more than interesting that Herbert Hoover has become the modern ideal of the liquidationist. In these very trying times, one is either that or a Keynesian, Hoover’s supposed opposite, an interventionist who believes there is no good in any recession or deflation at any time. To “prove” the superior foundations of the latter, the ideological associates of that position will always invoke the Great Depression. In what is the economic equivalent of Godwin’s Law, in some ways just a corollary since it was the Great Depression that made the Nazi extreme possible, to advocate free market liquidation is to be pressed into the corner of wanting another Great Depression.

It is, of course, a true non sequitur, for most who are committed to free markets can be so without ever having the slightest desire for calamity. It has been in the decades since the 1930’s a common tactic to associate free markets with such dangerous messiness and the role of government the virtuous economic janitor forced to clean up from the chaos. The panic in 2008 gives us a great test to some of those theories, especially as intervention was the rule almost from the start (August 2007 rather than February 2007, but still close enough to the initial rupture).

The fact that the Fed interceded at every turn but also on every count humiliatingly failed demonstrates one fact of false interventionist lore – that without the skill and courage, as Mr. Bernanke himself has called it, the Great “Recession” would have become a second Great Depression. In other words, without QE in this specific case there would have been no stopping the destructive capacity of the panic; it would have gone on and on and on until there was nothing left to the global economy.

That was always an irrational assumption, as even the messiest of free markets undergoing the messiest of liquidations reach on their own an end. No economy will ever liquidate down to zero. The idea that a crash will just keep on going until the enlightened central banker stops it is more politics than economics. In the case of 2008, it was truly absurd because nothing any central banker did led to any positive effects whatsoever. If the Panic of 2008 stopped, it was because it was always going to stop.

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Disclosure: This material has been distributed fo or informational purposes only. It is the opinion of the author and should not be considered as investment advice or a recommendation of any particular security, strategy, or investment product. Investments involve risk and you can lose money. Past investing and economic performance is not indicative of future performance. Alhambra Investment Partners, LLC expressly disclaims all liability in respect to actions taken based on all of the information in this writing. If an investor does not understand the risks associated with certain securities, he/she should seek the advice of an independent adviser.

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