Stocks: Be My Long-Term Valentine

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With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, stock bulls remain in love as the major indexes once again hit another new, all-time record high this week (Dow 20,269). Unfortunately, however, there are many other investors afraid of going through another 2008-2009-like break-up, so they remain single as they watch from the sidelines. In a recent post, I point out, as repeated record highs continue to be broken, the skeptics remain fearful of divorcing their cash. While it is indeed true that since the end of the 2016 presidential election, some investors are beginning to date stocks again, there are still wide swaths of conflicted observers very afraid of potential rejection.

As I’ve documented on numerous occasions, the skepticism is evident in the depressing long-term trends found in the weekly fund flows data and the disheartening record-low stock ownership statistics.

Long-Term Relationships

For some, casually dating can be fun and exciting. The same principle applies to short-term traders and speculators. In the short-run, the freedom to make free-wheeling, non-committal stock purchases can be exhilarating. Unfortunately, the fiscal and emotional costs of short-term dating/trading often outweigh the fleeting benefits.

How can you avoid the relationship blues? In short…focus on the long-term. Like any relationship, investing takes work, and there will always be highs, lows, and bumps in the road. It is better to think in terms of a marathon, rather than a sprint. The important lesson is to maintain a systematic, disciplined approach that you can apply irrespective of the changing investment environment. In other words, that means not loosely reacting (buying or selling) to presidential tweets of the day.

Famed investor Peter Lynch spoke about long-term stock fund investing in this manner

“If you invest in mutual funds and make mutual funds investment changes in less than 10 years…you’re really just ‘dating.’ Investing in mutual funds should be marital – for richer, for poorer, and so on; mutual fund decisions should be entered into soberly and advisedly and for the truly long term.”

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DISCLOSURE: Sidoxia Capital Management (SCM) and some of its clients hold positions in certain exchange traded funds (ETFs), but at the time of publishing had no direct position in any other security referenced in this article. No information accessed through the Investing Caffeine (IC) website constitutes investment, financial, legal, tax or other advice nor is to be relied on in making an investment or other decision. Please read disclosure language on IC Contact page.

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